Go ahead, ask me a question?   Afro inspired Craft, Fashion & Hair

dynamicafrica:

NEW MUSIC: Yemi Alade - Johnny.

Argue with me all you like, if you want to, but when it comes to Nigerian artists and music videos, the women seem to make much more interesting and dynamic music videos with far better storylines.

Want more proof? There’s this, this, this, this, this and this.

Bless the fashions in this video too!

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

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All Africa, All the time.

African music videos rock ;)

(via adeola)

— 2 weeks ago with 1134 notes
goddesscru:

darkergod:

"Slavery has never been abolished from America’s way of thinking."
Nina Simone

No lies detected.

goddesscru:

darkergod:

"Slavery has never been abolished from America’s way of thinking."

Nina Simone

No lies detected.

(via larockphotography)

— 2 weeks ago with 11563 notes

itsbollywood:

Deepika Padukone for Vogue

Amazing! That neck piece!

(via blackgirlwithanopinion)

— 1 month ago with 3725 notes
echoesofnoise:

Get excited for summer with these funky and beautifully shocking swimsuits from Bantu Wax!
Check out my article here, http://www.afropunk.com/profiles/blogs/ap-fashion-swimsuit-season-is-almost-here-bantu-wax-will-get-you
 Stay fly!


Love

echoesofnoise:

Get excited for summer with these funky and beautifully shocking swimsuits from Bantu Wax!

Check out my article here, http://www.afropunk.com/profiles/blogs/ap-fashion-swimsuit-season-is-almost-here-bantu-wax-will-get-you


Stay fly!

Love

(via nappyjoy)

— 1 month ago with 136 notes
theblackamericanprincess:

“I grew up with all mothers, all women. I come from a long line of matriarchs, very strong women.” 
-Erykah Badu

theblackamericanprincess:

I grew up with all mothers, all women. I come from a long line of matriarchs, very strong women.” 

-Erykah Badu

(Source: zenlanda, via nappyjoy)

— 1 month ago with 12177 notes
roseepetals:

Nigerian Woman during Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Lagos, 1956


Nigeria

roseepetals:

Nigerian Woman during Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Lagos, 1956

Nigeria

(Source: rhyythms, via nigerianostalgia)

— 1 month ago with 4970 notes
Stunning piece!

Stunning piece!

(Source: misterand, via adeola)

— 1 month ago with 8630 notes

vickynosecrets:

christyholl:

meisterj:

Remember when Disney was all like ‘fuck how races work and homogeneous casts and couples’?

Black and white couple produce fillipino-american child. White dude is the valet. White step mother, one white step sister, one black step sister. Just a jumble, and it ought to happen again.

Some facts from imdb:

First multi-racial cast performing Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella.

Whitney Houston was producing Rodger and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” and was to star in it until she decided that Brandy Norwood would make a better Cinderella. Brandy would not do it unless her idol Whitney took the Fairy Godmother role.

Brandy Norwood became the first African-American to play Cinderella. This version broke viewer-ship records when it debuted, and it holds the record for the bestselling video for a made for TV movie.

So fuck any noise where people say audiences don’t want to see a mixed race couple, or more people of color. This was a success from television. I still remember Brandy singing Impossible. 

That ought to happen again. Mixed race live action cast where the relationships don’t made genetic or racial sense.

I loved this movie so much. Impossible was my jam.

LOVE THIS MOVIE

More of this please!

(Source: lifeisblaq, via blackgirlwithanopinion)

— 1 month ago with 60575 notes

nigerianostalgia:

Madam Efunroye Tinubu, Iyalode of Egbaland (c.1805-1887).

Born in the Egba Land of the Yoruba people of West Africa at the beginning of the nineteenth century, Tinubu learned commerce from her grandmother, a successful trader. As a young woman Tinubu married a local man and bore him two sons, but she was widowed following the family’s migration to the town of Abeokuta in 1830. Shortly afterward she met Adele, a deposed king of Lagos, married him, and moved with her new husband and sons to the coastal town of Badagry, where Adele was temporarily recognized as ruler.

Tinubu arrived in Badagry at a time when the then illegal Atlantic slave trade was peaking on the eastern Slave Coast. Although her sons soon died, she used two slaves, allegedly a gift from her father, to trade between Abeokuta and the coast in slaves and other commodities. Never again blessed with children, she invested her growing income from trade in slaves and other retainers, beginning the process of amassing personal followers and expanding her commercial operations.

In 1835, Adele was invited back to Lagos to become king once again, and Tinubu accompanied him as a royal wife. Following her husband’s death two years later, she married Yesefu Bada (also known as Obadina), a successful Muslim warrior and favored retainer of the new king, Oluwole , ensuring Tinubu continued access to the commercial and other advantages associated with royal patronage.

In the bitter succession dispute between Akitoye and Kosoko that followed Oluwole’s death in 1841, Tinubu and Obadina actively supported Akitoye, who was initially crowned king but was defeated in 1845 and forced with his followers into exile at Badagry. Throughout these years of political turmoil, Tinubu seized opportunities to expand her trade and build a large and powerful household of slaves and other retainers. She also took a keen interest in Islam, which was spreading in Lagos.

When in 1851 the British, encouraged by Akitoye , bombarded Lagos, deposed Kosoko, and reinstated Akitoye as king in the name of ending the Atlantic slave trade and developing new kinds of commerce, Tinubu returned to the town. A fierce defender of African interests and autonomy, she soon ran afoul of the British, however, and was eventually driven by them out of Lagos and into exile at Abeokuta. There Tinubu reestablished a large household and used her slaves and retainers to produce and trade palm produce, a new export, and other commodities. She also began exercising considerable influence in politics in Abeokuta and was eventually recognized as the iyalode, or leading female chief, in the town.

Although the British represented Tinubu as an inveterate slave trader and fierce opponent of abolition, she was committed more to the success of her own political factions and to African autonomy than she was to a particular kind of foreign trade. Tinubu is significant historically both for her own activities and achievements and as an unusually well-documented example of a type of powerful precolonial West African woman, too often obscured from the historical record.

Vintage Nigeria

 

(via nigerianostalgia)

— 1 month ago with 143 notes
nappyjoy:

africancreature:

Meet Emeragreen, the Goddess of the moon, mountains and the earth.



Oh my…

Flawless!

nappyjoy:

africancreature:

Meet Emeragreen, the Goddess of the moon, mountains and the earth.


Oh my…

Flawless!

— 1 month ago with 5547 notes
nigerianostalgia:

A mounted Hausa warrior in full ceremonial regalia, Nigeria 1974Vintage Nigeria

Boom!

nigerianostalgia:

A mounted Hausa warrior in full ceremonial regalia, Nigeria 1974
Vintage Nigeria

Boom!

(via nigerianostalgia)

— 1 month ago with 367 notes